Category Archives: Random Content

2017 is the year

I completed my scientific paper and yesterday located the best journal for its publication. If everything goes well in 47 days my paper will be published and soon thereafter reported on. Just wanted to say thanks to all of my subscribers to my website who supported me by showing interest. Y’all are in the front row for history about to be made..
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‘Completing the Work of Galileo’

“Looking through his telescope, Galileo at first saw only three moons in a straight line across Jupiter, two at the left and one at the right. The next night he saw all three to the right. Galileo thought he was looking at distant stars and wondered how Jupiter had managed to move to the left of them. Two nights later he saw only two, and they were to the left of Jupiter. (The third was behind the plane.) Eventually Galileo counted four objects and realized that they were orbiting Jupiter: Their behavior made them moons, not stars. The discovery caused great excitement. When Johann Kepler heard of Galileo’s discovery he longed to see the new moons but did not have a telescope, and it was not until August 1610 that he finally did see them, and it was through a telescope that Galileo had made. Some astronomers refused to believe.
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Image: NASA’s New Horizons finds second mountain range in Pluto’s ‘Heart’

A newly discovered mountain range lies near the southwestern margin of Pluto’s Tombaugh Regio (Tombaugh Region), situated between bright, icy plains and dark, heavily-cratered terrain. This image was acquired by New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on July 14, 2015 from a distance of 48,000 miles (77,000 kilometers) and sent back to Earth on July 20. Features as small as a half-mile (1 kilometer) across are visible. Pluto’s icy mountains have company. NASA’s New Horizons mission has discovered a new, apparently less lofty mountain range on the lower-left edge of Pluto’s best known feature, the bright, heart-shaped region named Tombaugh Regio (Tombaugh Region). These newly-discovered frozen peaks are estimated to be one-half mile to one mile (1-1.5 kilometers) high, about the same height as the United States’ Appalachian Mountains. The Norgay Montes (Norgay Mountains) discovered by New Horizons on July 15 more closely approximate the height of the taller.
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‘Blowing my mind’: Peaks on Pluto, canyons on Charon

This Tuesday, July 14, 2015 image provided by NASA on Wednesday shows a region near Pluto’s equator with a range of mountains captured by the New Horizons spacecraft. (NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI)   Mankind’s first close-up look at Pluto did not disappoint Wednesday: The pictures showed ice mountains on Pluto about as high as the Rockies and chasms on its big moon Charon that appear six times deeper than the Grand Canyon. Especially astonishing to scientists was the total absence of impact craters in a zoom-in shot of one otherwise rugged slice of Pluto. That suggests that Pluto is not the dead ice ball many people think, but is instead geologically active even now, its surface sculpted not by collisions with cosmic debris but by its internal heat, the scientific team reported. Breathtaking in their clarity, the long-awaited images were unveiled in Laurel, Maryland, home to mission operations for NASA’s New Horizons, the.
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‘Beautiful eye candy’: Frozen plains in Pluto’s heart

In the center left of Pluto’s vast heart-shaped feature – informally named “Tombaugh Regio” – lies a vast, craterless plain that appears to be no more than 100 million years old, and is possibly still being shaped by geologic processes. This frozen region is north of Pluto’s icy mountains and has been informally named Sputnik Planum (Sputnik Plain), after Earth’s first artificial satellite. The surface appears to be divided into irregularly-shaped segments that are ringed by narrow troughs. Features that appear to be groups of mounds and fields of small pits are also visible. This image was acquired by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on July 14 from a distance of 48,000 miles (77,000 kilometers). Features as small as one-half mile (1 kilometer) across are visible. The blocky appearance of some features is due to compression of the image. Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI   Vast frozen plains exist next door to.
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